Mobility provisions of Canada's trade agreement with the EU: A BAL Backgrounder
  • Relocation Today - Maple LeafThe Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is a new trade agreement between Canada and the European Union that liberalizes trade, investment and the mobility of professionals. The agreement will further open doors between Canada and Europe and creates several preferential visa routes for professionals conducting certain activities, including intra-corporate transferees (ICTs) and suppliers of contractual services in a broad range of industries, as well as business visitors and investors.

    Canada signed the agreement Oct. 30, 2016, the European Parliament ratified it in February this year, and the agreement took provisional effect Sept. 21. While Canada has begun to implement most provisions, the CETA will take full effect when all EU Member States have formally ratified it.

    In signing a free-trade agreement with the EU, Canada is making another business-friendly move and opening access to European business and investment. Earlier this year, Canada introduced a Global Skills Strategy to attract international talent by providing faster and more predictable immigration processing for qualifying companies and high-skilled professionals.

    In addition to reducing trade barriers and tariffs on European goods and services, the CETA also eases mobility for EU professionals conducting certain activities in Canada, exempting some activities from work-permit requirements or eliminating labor market testing and easing criteria for others.


    Overall, the CETA will benefit EU-based companies by making it easier to send employees to Canada as ICTs or as suppliers of contractual services, and the agreement facilitates entry of short-term business visitors and EU nationals seeking to invest or establish a business in Canada.

    BAL's backgrounder explains each of these categories in detail. Click  here to read and download the full backgrounder. Key points include:

    • ICTs are exempt from the Labour Market Impact Assessment process and the ICT routes have an expanded duration of three years (instead of one year). The graduate trainee route is a new category that should benefit multinational companies hiring new graduates. However, companies must demonstrate that the employee fits the definition of senior personnel or specialist to fall under the ICT track.
    • The CETA introduces work permits for investors, aimed at attracting foreign direct investment. However, the one-year duration is a relatively short time to develop a business or investment.
    • Business visitors for investment purposes is a new route that provides important exemptions from work permits for individuals coming to Canada to set up an office or enterprise. But, the duration of stay is limited and the activities cannot include direct transactions with the public or being on local payroll.
    • The list of permitted business activities for short-term business visitors who are exempt from work permits has been expanded, allowing many EU nationals to come to Canada for short stays without needing to apply for a work permit.
    • Under CETA, work permits will be available for contractual services suppliers and independent professionals for a duration of 12 months in any 24-month period or the length of the contract, whichever is less.
    • The CETA provides a framework for Canada and EU Member States to agree on mutual recognition of professional qualifications. The framework allows the relevant professional associations on both sides to negotiate and agree on conditions for mutual acceptance of qualifications.

    Overall, the CETA is a positive development for business that will further open doors between Canada and Europe, facilitating mobility for multinational companies, contractual service providers in a broad range of industries, as well as business visitors and investors.

    We anticipate that the CETA will provide significant new options for EU nationals coming to Canada, especially those who are unable to qualify for a work permit. BAL is currently exploring cases that may qualify under the CETA, and interested companies should contact their BAL professional. For full details on the category breakdowns above, please click  here.

    This post has been provided by Berry Appleman & Leiden (BAL) Corporate Immigration. For more information please contact: Kristi Paulsen, with Relocation Today or  Jennifer Fisher with BAL
    About Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP

    Founded in 1980, Berry Appleman & Leiden (BAL) provides comprehensive global immigration services from seventeen offices across the U.S. and Globe. BAL manages global visa matters and customized application approaches for work permits, business visas, and residence permits in more than 100 countries. With a single cost center for worldwide operations, BAL offers centralized management with regional and local support for the complete spectrum of global immigration matters.

    Source: Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP
    Copyright © 2017 Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP. All rights reserved. Reprinting or digital redistribution to the public is permitted only with the express written permission of Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP. For inquiries please contact copyright@balglobal.com.

    About Relocation Today: Relocation Today, Inc. has been joyfully developing and serving corporate clients global relocation needs, supporting recruiting efforts & managing summer intern housing programs since 1994.  For more information on services or relocation benefits policy review please contact: Richard Rudeen, Business Development Manager 952.278.0530

Mobility provisions of Canada's trade agreement with the EU: A BAL Backgrounder
  • Relocation Today - Maple LeafThe Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is a new trade agreement between Canada and the European Union that liberalizes trade, investment and the mobility of professionals. The agreement will further open doors between Canada and Europe and creates several preferential visa routes for professionals conducting certain activities, including intra-corporate transferees (ICTs) and suppliers of contractual services in a broad range of industries, as well as business visitors and investors.

    Canada signed the agreement Oct. 30, 2016, the European Parliament ratified it in February this year, and the agreement took provisional effect Sept. 21. While Canada has begun to implement most provisions, the CETA will take full effect when all EU Member States have formally ratified it.

    In signing a free-trade agreement with the EU, Canada is making another business-friendly move and opening access to European business and investment. Earlier this year, Canada introduced a Global Skills Strategy to attract international talent by providing faster and more predictable immigration processing for qualifying companies and high-skilled professionals.

    In addition to reducing trade barriers and tariffs on European goods and services, the CETA also eases mobility for EU professionals conducting certain activities in Canada, exempting some activities from work-permit requirements or eliminating labor market testing and easing criteria for others.


    Overall, the CETA will benefit EU-based companies by making it easier to send employees to Canada as ICTs or as suppliers of contractual services, and the agreement facilitates entry of short-term business visitors and EU nationals seeking to invest or establish a business in Canada.

    BAL's backgrounder explains each of these categories in detail. Click  here to read and download the full backgrounder. Key points include:

    • ICTs are exempt from the Labour Market Impact Assessment process and the ICT routes have an expanded duration of three years (instead of one year). The graduate trainee route is a new category that should benefit multinational companies hiring new graduates. However, companies must demonstrate that the employee fits the definition of senior personnel or specialist to fall under the ICT track.
    • The CETA introduces work permits for investors, aimed at attracting foreign direct investment. However, the one-year duration is a relatively short time to develop a business or investment.
    • Business visitors for investment purposes is a new route that provides important exemptions from work permits for individuals coming to Canada to set up an office or enterprise. But, the duration of stay is limited and the activities cannot include direct transactions with the public or being on local payroll.
    • The list of permitted business activities for short-term business visitors who are exempt from work permits has been expanded, allowing many EU nationals to come to Canada for short stays without needing to apply for a work permit.
    • Under CETA, work permits will be available for contractual services suppliers and independent professionals for a duration of 12 months in any 24-month period or the length of the contract, whichever is less.
    • The CETA provides a framework for Canada and EU Member States to agree on mutual recognition of professional qualifications. The framework allows the relevant professional associations on both sides to negotiate and agree on conditions for mutual acceptance of qualifications.

    Overall, the CETA is a positive development for business that will further open doors between Canada and Europe, facilitating mobility for multinational companies, contractual service providers in a broad range of industries, as well as business visitors and investors.

    We anticipate that the CETA will provide significant new options for EU nationals coming to Canada, especially those who are unable to qualify for a work permit. BAL is currently exploring cases that may qualify under the CETA, and interested companies should contact their BAL professional. For full details on the category breakdowns above, please click  here.

    This post has been provided by Berry Appleman & Leiden (BAL) Corporate Immigration. For more information please contact: Kristi Paulsen, with Relocation Today or  Jennifer Fisher with BAL
    About Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP

    Founded in 1980, Berry Appleman & Leiden (BAL) provides comprehensive global immigration services from seventeen offices across the U.S. and Globe. BAL manages global visa matters and customized application approaches for work permits, business visas, and residence permits in more than 100 countries. With a single cost center for worldwide operations, BAL offers centralized management with regional and local support for the complete spectrum of global immigration matters.

    Source: Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP
    Copyright © 2017 Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP. All rights reserved. Reprinting or digital redistribution to the public is permitted only with the express written permission of Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP. For inquiries please contact copyright@balglobal.com.

    About Relocation Today: Relocation Today, Inc. has been joyfully developing and serving corporate clients global relocation needs, supporting recruiting efforts & managing summer intern housing programs since 1994.  For more information on services or relocation benefits policy review please contact: Richard Rudeen, Business Development Manager 952.278.0530